Real Talk: Being Single

As I’ve been hanging out in New York City for the last few weeks, I recently decided to make a reservation for one at a popular and busy dessert restaurant. After spending countless hours holed up in my friends’ apartment clocking my work hours and hustling over a new project (that I can’t wait to share with y’all soon!), I decided it was high time to take myself out for a sweet treat. So I made the 1.5 mile walk across Central Park toward the restaurant, ready to devour all things chocolate, only to end up slightly salty about a comment that was made to me by a waiter. As I was sitting down, he motioned to the empty seat and asked, “Where is your second person?” to which I kindly replied, “oh nope, it’s just me!” He half-smiled and said, “Oh, okay . . . well, enjoy.” That was one thing in itself, but then as I was leaving, he made sure to say to me over his shoulder, “hopefully next time there will be someone with you!”

While I don’t think there was any ill-intent in that this particular situation, I know that his comment could have been taken one of two ways: maybe it was said in kindness because it seemed like there should have been someone with me (like I’m cute and should have had a guy with me, or at least a friend), or that he was annoyed that — at the peak of their busy time of the day — they would only be serving one person/one meal instead of a “full party.” Sine I truly believe it was the former, you should know that I wasn’t personally offended. I have done so many things on my own at this point that a meal is pretty basic, and the truth is that I am totally comfortable taking myself out as I have learned over the last few years to truly enjoy my own company. What did take offense, however, was my not-so-slight justice complex, because all I could think was, “man, if I wasn’t as okay with being by myself, that could have really stung.” Which got me thinking even more that there are too many misconceptions around singleness, and — having been single for quite some time myself — there are a few things that I think need to be said about it from a single person’s perspective. And while I’ve confessed some things about singleness in the past, I’ve been searching for more: more truth, more guidance, and more encouragement for all of us as we, together, navigate the rapidly growing population of singles. But unfortunately, apart from this spot on message* (which I will reference many times in this post and encourage all of you to listen to ASAP), I haven’t come across much that suffices, thus I find myself here once again, sharing my heart on something that can be uncomfortable to talk about bluntly: singleness.

Read More
Follow

Your Calling: Do It Scared

“Calling” can be such a daunting, pressurizing word nowadays, and it can feel like the questions that we’re constantly being asked, or asking of ourselves, sound a lot like: what is your life’s calling; what do you feel called to do; and to what, whom, and where are you being called?   We spend so much time trying to figure out just what in the world our calling might be, asking God to reveal the things He wants us to do, searching our hearts to recognize our gifts and passions, and then attempting to piece it all together into something that maybe — just maybe — reflects what we should be doing with our lives.  But what if the idea of “calling” is much more simple than we think?  What if it has less to do with what we do and more to do with who we are in Jesus and where He has placed us?  I am not an expert by any means, but if there is anything that I’ve learned in my almost thirty years of life, it is that we are really good at complicating the things of God.  I have come to believe that the whole idea of calling is really quite simple, because if we look into Scripture, there are really only a few things that we are all called to do: to love God, to seek Him with all of our hearts, to love our neighbors, and to make disciples. I believe that this is our general call as believers, and regardless of what we do with our lives vocationally, these are first and arguably most important things that we are called to do.

Read More
Follow

Turning Twenty-Nine

As of today, I have officially entered into the last year of my twenties, and while I may be mildly freaking out about getting older, I am also quite excited about this next year of my life. The truth is that the closer I’ve inched toward thirty, the more I’ve found myself worrying, namely about the future, settling down, and being a “real adult”. But something shifted while I was traipsing around Europe, and I now find myself embracing this stage of life more than ever. Sure, it doesn’t look much like what life looks likes for most people my age, but it certainly is beautiful and wild and — I believe — exactly where I am supposed to be. And as I reflect on the last few years of my life that seemed full of worry and nerves and doubt, I have realized that if I could go back to give myself one piece of advice, it would be this…

Read More
Follow

On Minimalism

Minimalism has become something of a buzz word over the last few years, and it’s one that I am glad has made its way into the mainstream. Maybe it has something to do with how I grew up or the way I’ve lived as a young adult, but I’ve always been a fan of the “more is less” mentality, and seeing this idea of living with less in order to experience a more full life enrapture so many people has got me all kinds of giddy. See, I’ve never really had much — nor wanted much — so minimalism been a very natural space for me to move into as an adult human. My only issue with minimalism being such a trend right now, though, is that many think it’s a set-in-stone strategy, or that it can be too limiting or too overwhelming. I personally believe that minimalism is moldable: it is a way of living that can adapt differently to any person’s lifestyle. And my favorite part of minimalism? Having less stuff frees me up to do more, to love better, and to experience more of life, and I wouldn’t trade that for anything. The minimalist lifestyle might not be for everyone, but being more thoughtful and conscious about what we have, what we really need, and how we consume is easy (and important!) enough for everyone to do. So here are some of my thoughts and tips on why and how to do just that.

Read More
Follow